Hyderabadiz 2.0. Ka Adab Arz Hai

Welcome: This blog is about Hyderabad culture, land and people, "with a whole spectrum of experiences of Khatta (sour), Meetha (sweet), Pheeka (unsalted), Teekha (off), Khara (spicy), Kadva (bitter) brim with caring and lots of loving." as phrased by Mike Ghouse, a hyderabadi damad.

Adrak ke Panje urdu drama hyderabad

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SULAIMAN KHATEEB'S SAAS BAHU

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Hyderabadi Biryani, dakhni - click to view Google Videos

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hyderabadi dholak ke geet by arjumand nazeer

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Day and Night in Hyderabad - News update



Saturday, October 26, 2013

First Rolls Royce car in Hyderabad India



"One of the first Rolls Royce in India – the Nizam of Hyderabad’s 1912 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Throne car – has been restored to its original glory. : http://www.carsuk.net/ In 1911 the 6th Nizam of Hyderabad – Mehboob Ali Khan - ordered a Rolls Royce Silver Ghost, and had it sent off to Bakers of Edinburgh to create a very special body, fit for Nizam (think Maharajah, the generic term for Indian Royalty)." continue reading  http://www.carsuk.net/

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Monday, October 21, 2013

Deloitte cancelled the participation of Governor E.S.L. Narasimhan

No Guv at Deloitte fete


Extract:
Hyderabad: Multinational company Deloitte cancelled the participation of Governor E.S.L. Narasimhan in a programme scheduled for Tuesday as the protocol required playing the National Anthem twice while the company wanted it only once.Tuesday’s programme was to be the inauguration of the Deloitte Centre for Leadership Inclusion, aimed at giving due share to women, the Armed Forces and the differentlyabled.
Official sources said that Deloitte senior officials Hari Karra and Nagarajan had approached Raj Bhavan with a request to invite Narasimhan for the programme at their office premises in Mindspace.The Governor had accepted and Raj Bhavan protocol officials had handed over to the company representatives the protocol sheet, which includes the details of dos and don’ts for programmes attended by the Governor, a Constitutional head of the state. “It is a standard procedure and organisers have to follow it,” top official sources said. continue reading:  No Guv at Deloitte fete
Local office: 

Monday, October 7, 2013

Google to launch Street View for Indian monuments tomorrow, BGR India

By: Rajat Agrawal| Oct 2nd, 2013 BGR India

Extract: Google will officially launch Street View in India tomorrow albeit with a caveat. Instead of launching Street View of regular roads and localities, it will be limited to 100 monuments in India that people will be able to visit virtually from their PCs. Earlier in July, we had reported about Google’s Street View team hitting the Charminar in Hyderabad.

Image from google-street-view.com:




Much more:

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Hyderabad State's 1948 Police Action In Literary Narratives

  • From Nizam To Nation: The Representation of Partition in Literary Narratives About Hyderabad, Deccan, by Nazia Akhtar (Graduate Program in Comparative Literature A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy), The School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. 2013. 

    From the above source:
  • Basu, Tapan, et al. Khaki Shorts and Saffron Flags: A Critique of the Hindu Right. Hyderabad: Orient Longman, 1993.
  • Bhalla, Alok, Ed. Stories About the Partition of India. 3 vols. New Delhi: Indus, 1994.
  • Bristol Evening Post. “‘Disband Fanatics’ Call – India Sends Last Demand.” 7 Sep. 1948.
    Indo-Hyderabad Relations 108.
  • British Information Services. “Extract from Daily Press Summary, British Information
    Services dated 13th May, 1948.” Indo-Hyderabad Relations n.p.
    . “Extract from Opdom No.43 for period May 27th to June 2nd, 1948.” Indo-Hyderabad Relations 236. “Daily Press Summary – June 3-14, 1948. (Weekly).” Indo-Hyderabad Relations 310.
    . “Daily Press Summary, June 10, 1948.” Indo-Hyderabad Relations 309.
    . “Daily Press Summary – [date illegible] June 1948.” Indo-Hyderabad Relations 308.
  • Brockway, Fenner. “Hyderabad – How Can Britain Help.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-
    Hyderabad Relations 1-2.
  • Chaudhary, Chandragupta. “Marathwada in Anti-Nizam Struggle.” Glorious TelenganaArmed Struggle. By Raj Bahadur Gour et al. New Delhi: Communist Party of
    India, 1973. 126-35. 
  • Copland, Ian. “‘Communalism’ in Princely India: The Case of Hyderabad, 1939-40.”
    India’s Partition: Process, Strategy and Mobilization. Ed. Mushirul Hasan. New
    Delhi: Oxford UP, 1994. 361-95
  • Daily Express. “Abandoned.” Undated. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 7
  • Daily Telegraph. “A Grave Step.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 133.
    . Title not visible. 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 3.
  • Daily Worker. “The Threat in Hyderabad.” 20 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 21.
    . “Indian Communists Call on Hyderabad: ‘Arm Peasants Against Nizam.’” 18
    Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 16.
  • Dalrymple, William. “In Conversation.” The Untold Charminar: Writings of Hyderabad.
    Ed. Syeda Imam. New Delhi: Penguin, 2008. 47-64.
    . City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi. New York: Penguin, 2003.
  • Eagleton, Clyde. “The Case of Hyderabad Before the Security Council.” Hyderabad:After the Fall. Ed. Omar Khalidi. Wichita, Kansas: Hyderabad Historical Society,
    1988. 64-89.
  • Economist. “Exhausted Patience, 1948.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 13.
  • Edinburgh Evening News. “Indian Army Make Four-Pronged Attack on Hyderabad:
    Advances Claimed After Dawn Invasion.” 13 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 47?
  • Evening Argus. “Indians Halfway to Secunderabad.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 53.
  • Evening Standard. “War with Us.” 13 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 150.
  • Evening Times. “New Train Attack in Hyderabad.” 20 May 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 322.
  • Express and Star. “Hyderabad.” 13 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 65.
  • Gour, Raj Bahadur. “Hyderabad People’s Revolt Against Nizam’s Autocracy: A Diary of
    the Struggle.” Glorious Telengana Armed Struggle. By Raj Bahadur Gour et al.
    New Delhi: Communist Party of India, 1973. 1-125.
    . “Makhdoom: A Multi-Dimensional Personality.” Random Writings.
    Hyderabad: Makhdoom Society and Prachee Publications, 2002. 1-11.
    . “Makhdoom: His Struggle for Victory of Love and Labour.” Random Writings.
    Hyderabad: Makhdoom Society and Prachee Publications, 2002. 167-95.
  • Government of India. White Paper on Hyderabad. 1948.
    . “State wise 300 Districts of India with Top Muslim Population in Urban Areas.”
    Census of India Report 2001. Web. 4 Oct. 2012.
  • Hyder, Gulam. “Anti-Nizam Struggle: Participation of Muslims.” Glorious TelenganaArmed Struggle. By Raj Bahadur Gour et al. New Delhi: Communist Party of
    India, 1973. 136-153.
  • Hyderabad State Congress (Department of Publicity, Propaganda and Information).
    Lawyers Admonish the Nizam. Madras: Renaissance Printers Ltd, undated.
  • Indo-Hyderabad Relations: Press Cuttings April 1948-1948 Sept. India Office Records
    (IOR L/P&S/13/1241). National Archives of India, New Delhi. Microfilm.
  • Kannabiran, Vasantha and K. Lalitha. “That Magic Time: Women in the Telangana
    People’s Struggle.” Recasting Women: Essays in Colonial History. Eds. Kumkum
    Sangari and Sudesh Vaid. New Delhi: Kali for Women, 1989. 180-203.
  • Khalidi, Omar. “The 1948 Military Operations and Its Aftermath: A Bibliographic
    Essay.” Hyderabad: After the Fall. Ed. Omar Khalidi. Wichita, Kansas:
    Hyderabad Historical Society, 1988. 199-219.
    . “From Torrents to Trickle: Indian Muslim Migration to Pakistan, 1947-97.”
    Bulletin of the Henry Martyn Institute of Islamic Studies 16.1-2 (Jan-June 1997):
    32-45.
    , Ed. Hyderabad: After the Fall. Wichita, Kansas: Hyderabad Historical Society,
    1988.
  • Khalidi, Usama. “From Osmania to Birla Mandir: An Uneasy Journey.” Hyderabad:After the Fall. Ed. Omar Khalidi. Wichita: Hyderabad Historical Society, 1988. 188-98.
  • Leonard, Karen Isaksen. Locating Home: India’s Hyderabadis Abroad. Stanford:
    Stanford UP, 2007.
    . “Hyderabadis in Pakistan: Changing Nations.” Bates 224-244.
    . “Construction of Identity in Diaspora: Emigrants from Hyderabad, India.” The
    Expanding Landscape: South Asians and the Diaspora. Ed. Carla Petievich. New
    Delhi: Manohar, 1999. 41-69.
  • Liverpool Daily Post. Title not visible. 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 47?
  • Manchester Guardian. “Hyderabad.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations n.p.
    . “A Laughing Stock.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 20.
    . “Hyderabad Surrenders.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 19.
    340
    . “British Attitude to Hyderabad – Indian Resentment.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-
    Hyderabad Relations 15.
  • Morning Advertiser. “Aggression.” 15 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 61.
  • Munshi, K.M. The End of an Era: Hyderabad Memories. Bombay: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, 1957.
  • New Statesman and Nation. “Intervention in Hyderabad.” 17 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 32.
  • Nizam’s Government. Hyderabad’s Relations with the Dominion of India. Hyderabad:
    Government Press, 1948.
  • Paranjpe, Makarand, Ed. Sarojini Naidu: Selected Letters, 1890s to 1940s. New Delhi:
    Kali for Women, 1996.
  • Rao, Devulapalli Venkateswara. Telangana Struggle and the Path of Indian Revolution.
    Hyderabad: The Proletarian Line Publications, 1974.
    . Refutation of Wrong Trends Advocating Withdrawal of Telangana Armed Struggle. Hyderabad: The Proletarian Line Publications, 1982.
  • Reddy, Ravi Narayan. Heroic Telengana: Reminiscences and Experiences. New Delhi:
    Communist Party of India, 1973.
    Reid, Alec. “Hyderabad Today.” 1949. Inventing Boundaries: Gender, Politics and thePartition of India. Ed. Mushirul Hasan. New Delhi: Oxford UP, 2002. 259-66.
  • Reuters. “Indian Troops Will March to Hyderabad – Pandit Nehru” 10 Sep. 1948. Indo-
    Hyderabad Relations 97.
    . “Indian Troops Will March to Hyderabad – Pandit Nehru” 11 Sep. 1948. Indo-
    Hyderabad Relations 100.
    . “ADD – India Invades Hyderabad.” 13 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations
    116.
    . “India Invades Hyderabad.” 13 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 120.
    . “Reaction to Hyderabad Invasion.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 79-
    81.
    . “Karachi Press Comment on Hyderabad.” 19 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 39.
    . “‘Nation Indicted’ –Bevin Guilty.” 16 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 86.
    . “Britain Would Have Done the Same.” 17 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 33.
    . “Nehru Broadcasts on End of Hostilities.” 19 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 45?
    . “National Thanksgiving Day for India.” 20 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 24.
    . “Indian Governor-General Sends Congratulations.” Undated. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 29.
    . “All Hyderabad State Troops Now Surrendered.” 19 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 26-8
  • Reuters (Indian and Pakistani Service). “Indians Demonstrate Against B.B.C Broadcast.”
    Sheet 5. 19 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 38.
  • Rota, Sandra Lila Maya. “The Limits of Postcolonial Autobiography and the
    Empowering Capacity of Life-writing for the Postcolonial Subject.” Lingua e 1
    (2009): 47-63. Web. 12 May 2011.
  • Sajida, Zeenath. Interview by Yugantar. Archiving Hyderabad: Documenting the living
    memory of its citizens. Hyderabad: 2, 2007-2008. DVD.
  • Siasat. “Tragedy of Hyderabad Resurfaces After 50 Years.” 16 Sep. 2011. Web. 5 June
    2012.
  • Smith, Wilfred Cantwell. “Hyderabad: Muslim Tragedy.” Hyderabad: After the Fall. Ed. Omar Khalidi. Wichita: Hyderabad Historical Society, 1988. 1-25.
  • Spectator. “India’s Aggression.” 17 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 35.
  • Star. “‘Razakars’ Chief Tries Suicide.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 12.
  • Exclusive Sundar Lal report on Hyderabad police action deccanchronicle.com
  • Sundarlal, Pandit and Qazi Muhammad Abdulghaffar. “A Report on the Post-Operation
    Polo Massacres, Rape and Destruction or Seizure of Property in Hyderabad
    State.” Intro. by Omar Khalidi. Hyderabad: After the Fall. Ed. Omar Khalidi.
    Wichita, Kansas: Hyderabad Historical Society, 1988. 95-115.
    Sussex Daily News. “Hyderabad Claims Invaders Halted.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 51.
    . “Hyderabad.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 52.
  • Times. “Indian Demands to Hyderabad: Virtual Ultimatum.” 8 Sep. 1948. Indo-
    Hyderabad Relations 88.
    . “Armoured Columns Converge on Hyderabad.” 14 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 13.
    . “The Invasion of Hyderabad.” 15 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 4.
    . “Hyderabad Surrenders.” 18 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 6.
    . “Cease-Fire in Hyderabad – Nizam’s Order to Troops – Surrender Troops.” 18
    Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 5.
    . Untitled. 20 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 3.
  • Yorkshire Evening Press. Title illegible. 13 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad Relations 54.
  • Young, Desmond. “India and Hyderabad.” The Tribune. 10 Sep. 1948. Indo-Hyderabad
    Relations 109.
  • Zahir, Ali. “Dakhni Language.” Hyderabad Hazir Hai: Writings from the City of Nizams.
    Ed. Vanaja Banagiri. New Delhi: Rupa, 2008. 1-6.
On the same shelf:

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

The secular nationalism of Urdu --Hyderabad and Osmania University's role

The secular nationalism of Urdu Kavita Saraswathi Datla’s The Language of Secular Islam reviewed by A. Faizur Rahman, The Hindu 30 Sept 2013


Extract:"For Osmania University was neither a communal nor theological project despite the fact that it did have a faculty of Theology. According to statistics provided by Datla, by 1935 there were 1,806 students in the Osmania system: 771 in arts, 731 in sciences, 102 in medicine, 97 in law, 47 in engineering, 26 in education and only 32 in theology. In other words, theology was not a popular course a fact that indicates Muslim eagerness to be part of the secular mainstream. 
It is Datla’s case that such a tendency was encouraged by the Osmania University. She highlights two specific projects that were commissioned by the University which emphasised the highlighting the secular achievements of a Muslim past that would serve India well. They were, Taarikh-e-Hind (The History of India) by Sayyid Hashmi Faridabadi and Taarikh-e-Islam (The History of Islam) by Abdul Halim Sharar. These two histories, writes Datla, “claim space for Muslims within national and global narratives by asserting the importance of Muslims to the larger themes and imperatives of history and development.” “What Sharar and Faridabadi hoped ultimately to demonstrate was the compatibility of national and Islamic goals.” 
...The book also contains an extensive discussion on student politics in Osmania University, particularly the controversy surrounding the singing of Vande Mataram. She refuses to accept that this imbroglio was part of the freedom struggle in Hyderabad, or proof of anti-Hindu policies of the Nizam. She recounts how when (in November 1938) some students started singing the Vande Mataram in their hostel prayer rooms they were asked not to sing because the song, given its “political and controversial nature”, had the potential to hurt the feelings of non-Hindus. 
Not surprisingly, this was sought to be exploited by the Hyderabad State Congress and the Hindu Mahasabha. This, despite the fact that the striking students did not define their agitation in communal terms."  Continue reading The Hindu

About the book:
During the turbulent period prior to colonial India’s partition and independence, Muslim intellectuals in Hyderabad sought to secularize and reformulate their linguistic, historical, religious, and literary traditions for the sake of a newly conceived national public. Responding to the model of secular education introduced to South Asia by the British, Indian academics launched a spirited debate about the reform of Islamic education, the importance of education in the spoken languages of the country, the shape of Urdu and its past, and the significance of the histories of Islam and India for their present.

The Language of Secular Islam pursues an alternative account of the political disagreements between Hindus and Muslims in South Asia, conflicts too often described as the product of primordial and unchanging attachments to religion. The author suggests that the political struggles of India in the 1930s, the very decade in which the demand for Pakistan began to be articulated, should not be understood as the product of an inadequate or incomplete secularism, but as the clashing of competing secular agendas. Her work explores negotiations over language, education, and religion at Osmania University, the first university in India to use a modern Indian language (Urdu) as its medium of instruction, and sheds light on questions of colonial displacement and national belonging.

Grounded in close attention to historical evidence, The Language of Secular Islam has broad ramifications for some of the most difficult issues currently debated in the humanities and social sciences: the significance and legacies of European colonialism, the inclusions and exclusions enacted by nationalist projects, the place of minorities in the forging of nationalism, and the relationship between religion and modern politics. It will be of interest to historians of colonial India, scholars of Islam, and anyone who follows the politics of Urdu. Source: University Of Hawai'i Press.